Make sure you are buying items that are highly sellable, meaning that you there is a large market so you won’t have to wait years to find a buyer. And be disciplined enough only to buy items that allow you plenty of markup for resale. Specialization, or at least having most of your products fit your specialization, is highly likely to increase your chances of success.
A friend in Boston made a living doing this. He had lived in the Netherlands and was fluent in Dutch. He contacted companies who sent people to the Netherlands to work and live, and offered to provide not just his language expertise but important information on Dutch culture and living in the country. It worked. If you’re from or have lived in another country, consider channeling not just your language but your cultural expertise into a new career.
The easiest and cheapest option is the sole proprietorship, but to best protect your business, while still being affordable is the limited liability company. You'll want to research issues surrounding all forms of business structure now, because your decision will affect your startup costs, as well as your tax situation and your personal liability for the actions and debts of the business. Take advantage of the IRS's website for free tax information on the various legal forms of business organization.

Another option to fund your home business is to use personal and business credit cards. Many offer 0% APR for new clients while providing rewards or cash-back programs. On average, credit cards charge a 16% annual interest rate plus fees of about $50 to $100 annually. With credit cards, you don’t have to draw from your personal savings to fund your business.
Mild spoiler alert: Viewers of the TV drama Orange Is the New Black might remember that the show’s main character made amends with one of her fellow prison inmates by making her a soothing lotion. Hopefully you won’t find yourself in prison, but if you find yourself wanting to start a home-based business, consider hand-making soaps and lotions yourself.
Recently, I received an email from an individual who was looking for an online business opportunity. This person had just moved to a rural area and was unable to make the long commute to their prior job. Another obstacle this person faced was the issue of needing money ASAP to pay for bills and daily living expenses. However, they still wanted the flexibility and perks of being their own boss.
A great way to come up with a business idea is to brainstorm about your existing skills. Focus on identifying the skills that are unique to you or that you particularly excel at. Evaluating your previous professional experiences should give you a hint. Think of instances in which you were able to provide value to the organization for which you worked: do you notice any trends?
×