A friend in Boston made a living doing this. He had lived in the Netherlands and was fluent in Dutch. He contacted companies who sent people to the Netherlands to work and live, and offered to provide not just his language expertise but important information on Dutch culture and living in the country. It worked. If you’re from or have lived in another country, consider channeling not just your language but your cultural expertise into a new career.

Of course, I believe that you should start a blog for all the right reasons. My reasons are not to own material possessions or to show off. I don’t need a big house or expensive car. And definitely don’t want expensive clothes. I’d like to buy more time to spend with family and loved ones. To enjoy life’s best experiences with them, and be financially secure to take care of them during rough times. People come before money, and maybe one day I can take a year off like you did.


How can you make a living as a real social-media expert? Practice. Build an audience for yourself before offering your services to others. Determine your target sector, build your own online presence in that community and start making contact with the social-media elite. Twitter is a great place to start. Keep cranking out content and getting it to the right users, and you’ll find a way to get yourself hired even in an ever-expanding universe.
If you know how to make jewelry, there’s really no reason not to sell it. Handmade jewelry has long held appeal for collectors and admirers alike. The biggest challenge to setting up a jewelry business might be running the business itself—just making beautiful things won’t be enough to sustain the operation. Study up on what it takes to run a jewelry business and then make it happen. A great place to start is online with sites like Etsy and eBay

This article was co-authored by Michael R. Lewis. Michael R. Lewis is a retired corporate executive, entrepreneur, and investment advisor in Texas. He has over 40 years of experience in business and finance, including as a Vice President for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Texas. He has a BBA in Industrial Management from the University of Texas at Austin. This article has been viewed 267,253 times.
After all, you’re the only one who can decide if any of these home business ideas are plausible based on your specific situation and it will be up to you to follow through on any idea that strikes you. Luckily, the market for working from home—and therefore—home-based businesses, continues to grow, especially in small communities and niche markets. If you’re intent on shifting to a home-based career, then, the opportunity is out there to start, sustain, and even grow your own business.
All written content on this site is for information purposes only. Opinions expressed herein are solely those of AWM, unless otherwise specifically cited. Material presented is believed to be from reliable sources and no representations are made by our firm as to another parties’ informational accuracy or completeness. All information or ideas provided should be discussed in detail with an advisor, accountant or legal counsel prior to implementation.

While most entrepreneurs rely on their personal savings to start a business, others seek funding from banks or family and friends. In fact, 75% of small businesses used their personal finances to fund their business, while 16% went to banks, and 6% solicited the help of family and friends. Let’s look at several funding options and see which one’s the best for your home business.

Beta is when you’re testing out your product or service with the goal of receiving feedback. Find potential beta customers at trade shows, festivals, farmers markets, and other types of events where you can sell your product or service to a relatively small group of people. Consider offering discounts in exchange for customer feedback. While you can make some money with the beta, don’t let it distract you from your goal of testing and improving your idea.

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