I overheard my wife talking to a homeschool mom that raises and sells a certain type of dog (a registered breed of some kind) ranging from $1,000 to $1,800. I also know a couple teens that started a bread business where they sell the product at the local famer’s market and local stores. The product(s) have been so successful, most of the family has been involved in it.


I like these ideas! Besides being good ideas in themselves, they stimulate MORE ideas! Some of them reminded me of something I was reading about called Craigslist arbitrage – buying low and selling high on craigslist, kind of like the first part of the old Oregon Trail game, but with washers and dryers and bicycles instead of cases of crackers and horses. Sounds like fun!  Anyway, that one about the pooper-scooper business, that works, I know because I was quite successful in the pooper-scooper service I started back in 1988! I’ve been in the industry for 25 years now, though I don’t go out and scoop any more.

These pay-per-click ads appear on your blog. Every time somebody clicks on an ad (which is supposed to be about a subject related to your niche), you make a few cents or more. Small amounts each time, but it adds up. This is extremely hands-off. You just need to get a code from Google, place it on your website - and the ads will automatically appear on your blog. Google will only show ads that are relevant to your blog so it's a good experience for your visitors and maximizes the number of clicks you get, meaning more income.


Hi, I really enjoyed this article. I think everyone has a skill they can market like being a VA, writing, web design etc for some extra cash. I think the main thing to consider when starting a business is if you can run the business with your day job. It’s great if you can build a service based business to work from home but it takes time to build these business to replace a wage – it took me three years. Great post!
Currently, in the United States, millions of self-employed individuals consider their home to also be their place of business. Taking this into consideration, you might not find it surprising that 80%-90% of the U.S. workforce admits that they’d like to work remotely at least part-time. Working from home—in whatever form it takes—has grown in popularity over the past decade, and it’s not difficult to figure out why.

But if you get the green light to do it, starting a catering service is a relatively low-overhead way to create a new business. It’s a lot of work, but if you enjoy cooking, it could turn into a lucrative and fulfilling career. To get started with minimal investment, you could first cook in your customers’ homes and use their dishes. Also, a narrow specialization on a particular type of cuisine or event may help you attract clientele as you work develop a strong customer base.
Handcrafted products: These are items you make yourself, like jewelry, clothing, paper goods, wooden decor, and food. This is a great option if you’re crafty, want full control over production, and are looking for lower startup costs. But bear in mind: it can be harder to capitalize on success — it’s more difficult to scale when you personally make each and every product.
Recently, I received an email from an individual who was looking for an online business opportunity. This person had just moved to a rural area and was unable to make the long commute to their prior job. Another obstacle this person faced was the issue of needing money ASAP to pay for bills and daily living expenses. However, they still wanted the flexibility and perks of being their own boss.
Financial projections are estimates of how much money the business will earn and spend over the first three years in business. It’s important that you have these in your business plan if you want to receive funding from a bank or investor, because they usually require it. In addition, establishing solid financial projections is essential even after you start the business. Successful companies usually produce month-by-month projections and evaluate how close they come to actuals to gain insight into how the business is really doing.
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